transferring to another school - freshman year transferring to a better school
transferring to a different school transferring colleges as a freshman freshmen issues and college transfers reach the college student market
transferring credits course credit changing schools
transferring to a better school

College Freshmen
Issues With Which To Deal

First, Enter A College
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  If you're thinking about transferring to another school after freshman year, we recommend planning your course load very carefully and trying to find out if the schools to which you would like to apply...will even accept those classes at all. In general, try to take only basic, "core" classes during your first year at the school you plan on leaving. Generic math, writing, and competency courses are more likely to have similar counterparts at other schools and thus, they make for an easier transfer. Unique, specialty courses are not always going to be available in other schools and are less likely to earn you any credit. Too many students wait too long to find this out and wind up taking a few courses during their freshman year that cannot be transferred--and thus, were taken in vain!
  Consider the time, money, and effort that might be involved in transferring and ask yourself if it's really worth it. If you started taking classes at a typical state college because your first choice of schools rejected you and you're trying to work up a respectable GPA for the purpose of transferring, that's fine. If your current school is too expensive and you need to transfer to a school with much lower tuition costs, that's another great rationale for switching the college you attend! But if you're just looking for a change of scenery or even interested in a school with only a little bit of a better name, it's probably not worth it! In the grand scheme of things, most state & local colleges are going to be regarded with about the same level of respect (or even lack thereof) by employers. Unless you're transferring to an Ivy league school, the change might not really make enough of a difference in your future to compensate for all the time and effort you're going to put into transferring.
   Many students decide to spend a year or so at their local community college before transferring to a 4 year school. At the very least, we advise these students to do some extra research before making such a decision as community college credits are sometimes the LEAST transferable of all! You may wind up spending an extra year in school with so little of that first year even being counted towards your graduation. It's simply not worth it! When asked why they decided to go to a community college first, a good number of these students report that they didn't believe their grades in high school were strong enough to get them into a 4 year school. In our opinion, these students are unfortunate victims of the pre-college curriculum's lesson that university coursework is going to be excruciatingly difficult. As described in our "freshmen issues" section, such is simply not always the case! Many college students actually prefer the "higher education" curriculum to that of the more rule-intensive, stringent lower-level curricula! And the course content delivered at most community colleges really isn't that much different than the course content delivered by the typical four year college anyway! But the grades you'll receive from community colleges are less frequently honored as transfer credits than the grades you'll earn by taking similar courses at 4 year schools! So why waste your time at a community college first when you know you want to go 'all the way' to the end of a 4 year program? Our advice is to go right for the 4 your school and skip over community college if you can. You'd be surprised how many schools WILL accept you despite what some teachers may have led you to believe to the contrary while you were in high school. At the very least, give it a shot: you'll never know 'till you try!